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"The Hadban are listed as the fourth preference among all the horse strains meticulously described in the Abbas Pasha manuscripts. The Hadban are a substrain of Kuhaylan, but in modern day they tend more to the Saqlawi in type. The Hadban are a great "blending" strain. Some of the most renowned breeding stallions in modern Egypt have come from this strain (e.g., Ibn Rabdan, Nazeer, Aswan). The Dafeer tribe were prominent breeders of this strain. The original traces to the ancient tribe of Beni Lam. The name derives from a mare of the Ben Lam. The mare had a profusely long mane which covered her forehand completely (hadbasalifa) and for that reason she was called Hadba. And the strain was named for her. Most distinguishing characteristics: Handsome and elegant. Great endurance and strength among the Hadban trademarks. They are very good all around horses, having perhaps the finest blood to produce cavalry horses as well as excellent race horses. Head: Can be somewhat boney and straight in profile. Pyramidical in shape. Very wide across the forehead and between the jowls. Relatively short skull. Eyes large and lustrous. Nostrils large and well-shaped. Ears relatively small. Neck: Relatively long, but in balance with body. Muscular, yet refined. Set on more upright than the Kuhaylan. General Confirmation: Long deep shoulders, deep chest. Hindquarters may tend to be light in comparison to the forehand. Relatively long back, short croup, good hip. Fine bone and clean joints. This strain harmonizes well with all families because it is not extreme in itself."
"The Kuhaylan are the original (the ancient) Arabian desert horse. All strains are said to descend from the Kuhaylan. The name derives 'from the black marks certain Arabian horses have around their eyes; marks which give them the appearance of being painted with Kohl after the fashion of Arab women.' Most distinguishing characteristic: Masculine - muscular and powerful. The ideal Kuhaylan is a contrast to the ideal Saqlawi. Both are within the standard of Arabian type, but the Kuhalylan is masculine and the Saqlawi feminine. One is reminded of the Biblical description of Jobe's warhorse when thinking of the Kuhaylan. Head: Very distinguished as to Arabian characteristics. Intimate details are chiseled into skull and facial features. Broadest forehead of all strains with shortest skull. Greatest width between the jowls. Small ears and very large, dark expressive eyes. Neck: Proportionate to overall conformation. Sometimes comes out of chest slightly lower than other strains. General Conformation: Symmetrical and of rounded outlines. Well-balanced, deep chested, wide from front and behind. Compact appearance. Broad across back and hindquarters. Wide forearms and gaskins. Masculine in overall appearance."
Twenty strains are known today. Of these, only twelve are considered to have been kept pure. The other eight are known to have been crossed with Turcoman stallions. All strains are derivatives of the Kuhaylan. The Pyramid Society shows 11 strains in their Manual of Straight Egyptian Arabian Horses.
"The Saqlawi are listed as the third preference among all the strains documented in the Abbas Pasha manuscript. The name apparently derives from saqla - meaning a kick. It is said there was an old Kuhayla Ajuz mare among the Kamsa and she was "a saqla mare," meaning while galloping she kicked her heels in the air. And so the strain was named after her, Saqlawiya. Most distinguishing characteristics: Feminine grace and elegance. The ideal Saqlawi represents beauty and refinement in the extreme. Feminine in appearance, they are of equal endurance to the Kuhaylan strains. Lighter in weight and leaner in frame that the Kuhaylan, they are not as strong in the hindquarters, tending to be a bit "light behind," with a tendency to stand under slightly. They are very high-spirited and are natural show horses. They have also succeeded admirably on the race track. The tendency to white markings (blazes, stockings, etc.) comes up through the Saqlawi lines. Raswan noted a preponderance of chestnuts with flaxen manes among this strain; more greys in the Kuhaylan. This is also true among the Moniet family today. Head: Longer and slightly narrower than the Kuhaylan. Longer foreface (eye to muzzle), somewhat resembling the beautiful desert racing camel's head in proportion. Very fine muzzle (the teacup muzzle). Eyes are large, dark and placed lower in the skull than in the Kuhaylan. Nostrils are extremely fine. Skin and hair very silky. Neck: Longer than the Kuhaylan, but in proportion to a longer body. Well-shaped and slender, and carried high. General Confirmation: Overall they are well balanced with good height. They are longer-backed than the Kuhaylan and have strong level toplines with high tail carriage. They are very fine boned and are lighter in bone than the Kuhaylan."
"Dahman are reputed to be from the horses of King Solomon. The name "dahman" means the "dark or black." Originally it was a substrain of the Saqlawi and represents an ideal blending of the Kuhaylan and Saqlawi type. The Dahman crosses exceptionally well with the modern Saqlawi strain. Most distinguishing characteristics: balance and harmony. The Dahman are very classic in type. They resemble the Saqlawi inelegance, but lean towards the Kuhaylan in strength. Head: Delicately shaped (refined), exceptional beauty, broad and relatively short head with balanced proportions between eyes and poll, and eyes and nostrils. The head is concave in profile, frequently with apronounced "dish". Eyes are large and very expressive. Ears are small and thorn-like, as in old lithographs of Victor Adam. Neck: Harmoniously balanced with the body. Throats are well shaped and clean. Good poll setting. General Confirmation: Strong toplines, relatively short backs in comparison to Saqlawi and Hadban. Level croups of good length, good hips. Legs are clean and fine-boned."
"The Abeyyan are listed as the 6th chapter in the Abbas Pasha manuscript. Origianlly a substrain of Saqlawi. Ideally is very similar in type to the Saqlawi. Name originated when during a raid a bedouin threw off his 'beyyah' (cloak) to lighten his mare's burden, and when he finally had out distanced his pursuers, he looked back and found his Abeyyah had been carried on the high-borne tail of the mare. Thereafter the strain was named Abeyyah - for the mare who carried the abeyyah on her tail. Very showy like Saqlawi, somewhat longer back. Elegance personified. Extreme tail carriage. Head: Resembles Saqlawi, but somewhat longer skull with elongated, convex, bulging forehead. Fine muzzle and delicate nostrils. Huge eyes, dark, set deep. Strong jowls. Neck: Refined and well-shaped. Relatively long. General Conformation: Usually deep chest. Extremely long forearm. Very Straight hind legs (indicating great speed in spite of the small size of the Abeyyan, which Raswan commented were rarely over 14 hands if pure in the strain). Today's horses of this strain are taller. High tail carriage. Somewhat "saddle" or soft back. Withers extend further into the back than most other strains. Proportionally immense shoulders. Favored for polo horses because of sure footedness and agility. Long fetlocks were typical of this family strain."
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